Coffee is to people as gasoline is to automobiles. The fuel we use for a productive day is important to us. But for the majority of us, coffee isn’t just a means to an end. We love coffee, and we know the difference between your run-of-the-mill brew and the “good stuff.”

As consumers, we’ve become more and more picky about the coffee we drink. The majority of us are only willing to drink a high-quality brew, and want a number of options beyond black coffee.

So what does this mean for the companies selling the coffee?

 

Did you know 59% of Americans drink a cup of coffee every day, and it often plays a big role in the working person’s world. It’s no surprise that its benefits have been studied over and over again. Not only does coffee help you be more productive at the office, but it’s also been proven to help fight against the risks of heart conditions, cancer, and Alzheimer’s disease.

Employees spend an estimated average of $1,092 a year on coffee. It’s easy to point to the need to “wake up” in order to work well, but there is far more to how coffee impacts an employee than the benefit of “waking up.”

Would an office without coffee be a far less productive workplace? Are there benefits beyond productivity that a coffee service would provide?

Here are the five key facts you need to know about how coffee impacts your workplace.

Au naturel, and “as close to the dirt as possible.”

If you haven’t heard, the Pope is coming to the US this fall season. It’s been said he’ll be staying in several different church properties, parading down several major highways, and arranging coffee delivery from Belforte del Chienti, Italy.

It turns out the Pope needs his home comfort in the form of good java. Tracey Allen, head of Specialty Coffee Association of America, was contacted for the Pope’s special coffee request, and has been conducting private taste testings for several months. It is said that Pope Francis is very selective about his coffee, understanding the multi-faceted process that takes place between production and consumption. Allen reveals Pope Francis is a big fan of fresh and local, so her company has been concocting a specialty “Pope brew” in hopes of satisfying the saintly father on his trek through the US.

 

Fiji recently launched a commercial showcasing the pureness of their water, which got us thinking; where exactly does that water come from, and what makes it so pure? Turns out the successful water bottle company gets their aqua from a natural source on the island of Viti Levu, in the remote hideaway, Yaqara Valley. Similarly, Poland Spring gets their water from a natural spring in Maine, a state renowned for their freshwater lakes, ponds, rivers and streams. So what do these h20 coves have in common? They are untouched by other bodies of water, namely the ocean, and other people. These waters are undiluted, free from foot traffic, skinny dipping tourists, and hot-to-trot sea creatures.