Every company seeks to make a good impression on potential clients. There’s usually a warning for employees to be on their best behavior, a tidying up of the conference room, a straightening of ties, clearing of throats. But what about pleasant, unexpected surprises, like fresh coffee and juice? Or a variety of snacks for your clients to munch on? These things make a huge impact on people whether it seems “huge” or not.

 

If you’ve tasted one, you’ve tasted them all.. This couldn’t be less true for coffee and the infinite variation contained in it’s rich, flavorful blends. Java scientists and tastebud technicians are constantly reconfiguring coffee blends, adding swirls of spice and dashes of ideas, like it’s a goblet of witches brew. The diversity contained within, and available for, coffee blends has grown substantially, and the alchemists behind the scenes are continuing to churn out deliciously different blends of mocha.

 

You’re probably familiar with the phrase “water cooler talk:” leisurely conversation and friendly exchanges between colleagues that take place around the office water cooler. Why the water cooler? It could be because the bathroom is too awkward. Your desk- too obvious that you’re not working. The kitchen- you’re too busy looking for munchies. But the water cooler is perfect. It’s against the wall, away from it all, providing a purified fountain of deliciously cooled h20. And the best part? There’s nothing to do while drinking your water but hang out. Talk. Chat. Laugh. Share.

 

Sometimes, you can just tell when an office is too dry. Not the kind of dry that’s solved with a humidifier. The kind of dry where employees lag. There’s no juice. There’s no rush to get things done. People move slow, brainstorming struggles to flow.. In other words, there’s not enough water in the office. People aren’t replenishing their systems. And the office isn’t functioning like a well-oiled machine. It’s functioning like a dry, rusted, squeaky machine, forcing itself along.

 

So you think you know your audience; the people who frequent your store every morning? Do you notice what your guests put into their cup, what they prefer? What about the ones who leave because you don’t have what they prefer? Do you understand the coffee audience you’re serving, the ones you’re missing out on and the reasons why specific “types” come into your coffee bar?

There’s a lot that goes into the process of studying your customers. And most of the time, we’re too busy switching pots, filling pots, taking orders and punching numbers to recognize the kind of guest our store brings in. It’s not a means of putting your customers in a box; there are all different shades and hues of coffee drinkers. But through the years, we’ve seen enough outstanding factors to classify a certain “type” from another “type.

 

Starbucks And Dunkin’ Deliver Coffee, But Not Coffee Service

If you’ve been hesitant to bring in a coffee delivery service for your office or store, now is the time to reconsider. Coffee delivery services are taking the world by storm. Recently, Dunkin Donuts and Starbucks have announced their plans to start delivering our can’t-live-without morning beverage, and they’re itching to launch these sizzling services asap.

 

Have we lost our java way?

With coffee prices on the rise, it’s no wonder that Americans are turning to cheaper brands to satisfy their morning buzz. Luxury taste and gourmet flavor has slipped the the wayside as our survival instincts kick in, and our wallets want nothing more than to grab whatever does the least amount of damage. Value coffee is and has been on the rise for quite some time. With the drought in Brazil hindering crops, chains like McDonalds and Dunkin Donuts, and many convenience stores as well, have been gaining in popularity. Does that mean your team also has to settle for fast food coffee?